Peter Jackson: The Lincoln City story

It was all doom and gloom surrounding Sincil Bank in October 2007. John Schofield was sacked as Lincoln City boss with the club firmly rooted at the bottom of the Football League, staring at relegation.

Former Huddersfield Town boss Peter Jackson was appointed as Lincoln City’s new manager, with the sole responsibility of saving the club from non-league football. He was a breath of fresh air. Full of hope, optimism, and belief, Jackson was certain he could turn around this modest club.

The larger than life character didn’t get off to the best of starts. His reign as Lord of the Imps started with a controversial 1-0 defeat at home to Chester, where he got himself sent off for arguing with the match officials.

However it was not long until Jackson rallied his red and white troops and led them to safety. When he took over, he thought that saving the club from relegation was his biggest fight. However, football paled into insignificance when Jackson, a former Newcastle United centre half, was diagnosed with throat cancer.

Undeterred, he continued managing the club right up until his treatment. If you can say anything about him, one of the first words to describe him is a battler, and in true Jackson style he was positive and won his battle.


Throughout his treatment, Jackson's family and football kept him going and everyone connected with football was pleased to see him come through and reclaim the helm at Sincil Bank.

The start of the 2008/09 season was full of optimism. On paper, Jackson had signed some impressive names, such as former Chelsea defender Frank Sinclair. The Imps had a great pre-season, playing a full strength Aston Villa side off the park. However for one reason or another it just didn’t work out. Results were frustratingly inconsistent and their home form was nothing short of woeful. The season ended on a downer with a defeat at home to Aldershot.

This was the beginning of the end for Jackson. The clouds were starting to surround Sincil Bank again. The summer was crucial for Jackson. He lost many first team players to clubs higher up the football pyramid, and replaced them with youngsters.

The season started with a home win against Barnet. Despite not playing well a home win was well received. This was followed by a disappointing defeat at Accrington Stanley. Although they won at Bradford, the clouds were still darkening around Sincil Bank. Further losses at Dagenham & Redbridge and at home to newly-promoted Burton Albion left Jackson hanging by a thread.

Things came to a head the day after a disappointing 1-0 defeat at Darlington in the Johnstone’s Paint Trophy. On September 2nd a club statement was released outlining the sacking of manager Peter Jackson and his assistant Iffy Onuora.Jackson eventually paid the price for a poor home record and falling attendances in this precarious financial climate where every penny counts.

It was all doom and gloom surrounding Sincil Bank in October 2007. John Schofield was sacked as Lincoln City boss with the club firmly rooted at the bottom of the Football League, staring at relegation.
Former Huddersfield Town boss Peter Jackson was appointed as Lincoln City’s new manager, with the sole responsibility of saving the club from non-league football. He was a breath of fresh air. Full of hope, optimism, and belief, Jackson was certain he could turn around this modest club.
The larger than life character didn’t get off to the best of starts. His reign as Lord of the Imps started with a controversial 1-0 defeat at home to Chester, where he got himself sent off for arguing with the match officials.
However it was not long until Jackson rallied his red and white troops and led them to safety. When he took over, he thought that saving the club from relegation was his biggest fight. However, football paled into insignificance when Jackson, a former Newcastle United centre half, was diagnosed with throat cancer.
Undeterred, he continued managing the club right up until his treatment. If you can say anything about him, one of the first words to describe him is a battler, and in true Jackson style he was positive and won his battle.
Throughout his treatment his family and football kept him going and everyone connected with football was pleased to see him come through and reclaim the helm at Sincil Bank.
The start of the 2008/09 season was full of optimism. On paper, Jackson had signed some impressive names, such as former Chelsea defender Frank Sinclair. The Imps had a great pre-season, playing a full strength Aston Villa side off the park. However for one reason or another it just didn’t work out. Results were frustratingly inconsistent and their home form was nothing short of woeful. The season ended on a downer with a defeat at home to Aldershot.
This was the beginning of the end for Jackson. The clouds were starting to surround Sincil Bank again. The summer was crucial for Jackson. He lost many first team players to clubs higher up the football pyramid, and replaced them with youngsters.
The season started with a home win against Barnet. Despite not playing well a home win was well received. This was followed by a disappointing defeat at Accrington Stanley. Although they won at Bradford, the clouds were still darkening around Sincil Bank. Further losses at Dagenham & Redbridge and at home to newly-promoted Burton Albion left Jackson hanging by a thread.
Things came to a head the day after a disappointing 1-0 defeat at Darlington in the Johnstone’s Paint Trophy. On September 2nd a club statement was released outlining the sacking of manager Peter Jackson and his assistant Iffy Onuora.
Jackson eventually paid the price for a poor home record and falling attendances in this precarious financial climate where every penny counts.

One Response to Peter Jackson: The Lincoln City story

  1. Rachel Pearse says:

    You can see Peter Jackson each week on The Football League website, with his own blog dedicated to League 2 – http://www.football-league.co.uk/league2blog/peter-jacksons-blog-20091014_2270538_1826117