Day of destiny for Scotland

As voters go to the polls to decide the future of Scotland, activists from both camps are on a last ditch charm offensive.

As voters go to the polls to decide the future of Scotland, activists from both camps are on a last ditch charm offensive.

After nearly three years of campaigning, the people of Scotland finally go to the ballot box today to say aye or naw to independence.

Queues had formed at several polling stations before voting began at 7am and local councils have prepared for a record turnout.

Yes activist Jeanette Campbell from the Scottish Nationalist Party and No man John Knox from the Liberal Democrats is on a last minute charm offensive outside the Mayfield Salisbury Church in Newington, Edinburgh this morning.

John Knox said many voters have been switching between yes and no during the campaign period and a friendly smile on the way into the polling station could trigger a change of heart.

They both agree that spirits where high and the mood friendly, despite several incidents of aggressive behaviour over the last few days.

Now they hope Scots will keep their interest in politics even after the referendum and engage in shaping Scotland, independent or part of the UK.

John Knox said: “I remember when I was young in the 1960s, it was a lot of student activism and everyone was involved in politics. I hope the referendum will have some of the same effect on young people today as 1968 had  on my generation.”

The referndum debate has been long and at times hostile, but has calvanised the political interest of the Scots.

The referendum debate has been long and at times hostile, but has calvanised the political interest of the Scots.

Wimbledon champion and Scot Andy Murray today broke cover on Twitter in the eleventh hour, endorsing the yes campaign. He tweeted: “Huge day for Scotland today! No campaign negativity last few days totally swayed my view on it. Excited to see the outcome. Let’s do this!”

Voting is under way at over 5,000 polling stations across Scotland. 97% of the electorate has registered to vote and a turnout of more than 80%, maybe 90%, is expected. In the 1979 referendum only 64% of Scots voted.

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