Cheers to the revolution

Microbrewer Steve Marston built his own brewery equipment and now supplies pubs and events across the East Midlands. Photo: Asmund Lovdal

Microbrewer Steve Marston built his own brewery equipment and now supplies pubs and events across the East Midlands. Photo: Asmund Lovdal

 

 

Not since the 1940’s has there been so many breweries in the United Kingdom, and new ones keep popping up.

Steve Marston is one of the thousands of beer enthusiasts taking the leap from drinking to brewing. In 2013 he set up Cathedral Heights Brewery on an industrial estate in Bracebridge Heath.

He explained that what started as a hobby, soon became serious business: “My girlfriend and I started experimenting with brewing in the kitchen, but we soon went further and when we decided to get married, why not supply our own wedding with beer?

“We went to a beer festival in Nottingham and received some great feedback. I decided to try to be a successful brewer and started building the brewery. Most of the equipment we use is built by me. Hopefully we will be able to continue expanding and I can quit my part time job to be a full time brewer.”

Steve Renshaw, branch secretary of the Lincoln Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA), says the quality and diversity is the key to real ale success. As a night out at the pub has become more expensive over the years, customers want something different for their money than the big brand lagers they can by cheap at the supermarket. He said:

“People want to try something new and exciting when they first pay three pounds for it. There is also a more general trend over recent years that people care much more about how their food and drink is made. Interest for locally sourced food and drink has increased dramatically and helped real ale make a breakthrough.”

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