Students’ winning artwork displayed in new Isaac Newton Building

Two Lincoln students have had their artwork displayed in the university’s new Isaac Newton Building, after they were announced as winners of an on-campus competition.

Amelia and Orlagh’s winning ‘ripple’ design. Photo: University of Lincoln.

Amelia Eddershaw and Orlagh Smith – who are both first year Creative Advertising students – won the challenge to create a piece of art for the £28 million building with their ‘ripple’ design (pictured left).

“We drew on the idea of energy as both Orlagh and I thought this was a key part of the new Isaac Newton Building and the university as a whole,” Amelia said.

“We felt that the ripples would be dynamic and engaging without distracting from the space it occupies, while the colour pallet really shows off the design and, to us, represents the amalgamation of the cultures, personalities and talents that we see here at the University.”

The piece of art has now been placed on display in the main atrium of the Isaac Newton Building as construction continues. Once completed, the site will be home to students and staff from engineering, computer science, mathematics and physics.

The artwork takes pride of place in the building’s main atrium. Photo: University of Lincoln.

Gyles Lingwood, who is Director of Education and Students in the university’s College of Arts, organised the contest and said the students’ winning design ‘hit a chord’ with him and the rest of the judging panel.

“Amelia and Orlagh’s design is very confident. It is incredibly energetic and dynamic, working just as successfully up-close as it does from a distance, and appearing to take a life of its own at every glance.

“Creatively bringing science and art together in an arresting and beautiful image, I’m sure the design will capture the attention and imagination of visitors to the university,” said Gyles.

Over 30 creative teams submitted designs for the competition and the best entries will be on display in an arts exhibition in the University Library later this month.

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